ATHLETIC SHOES

ATHLETIC SHOES

Athletic shoes are grouped into categories: Running, training and walking. This includes shoes for hiking, jogging and exercise walking. For a walking shoe, look for a comfortable soft upper, good shock absorption, smooth tread, and a rocker sole design that encourages the natural roll of the foot during the walking motion. The features of a good jogging shoe include cushioning, flexibility, control and stability in the heel counter area, as well as lightness and good traction. While the impacts of differences among types of footwear may be minimal on a single run, the cumulative effect on performance and health can provide a competitive edge.

When training, trainers with support and cushioning are recommended because unsupportive, uncushioned shoes can potentially cause repetitive stress injuries if used over a long period of time. For speed workouts, often held on tracks, lighter shoes with less cushioning and support may be used.

Athletic shoes

Court sports. Includes shoes for tennis, basketball and volleyball. Most court sports require the body to move forward, backward and side-to-side. As a result, most athletic shoes used for court sports are subjected to heavy abuse. The key to finding a good court shoe is its sole.

Field sports. Includes shoes for soccer football, and baseball. These shoes are cleated, studded or spiked. The spike and stud formations vary from sport to sport, but generally there are replaceable or detachable cleats, spikes or studs affixed onto nylon soles.

Track and field sport shoes. Because of the specific needs of individual runners, athletic shoe companies produce many models for various foot types, gait patterns and training styles.

Specialty sports. Includes shoes for golf, aerobic dancing and bicycling.

Outdoor sports. Includes shoes used for recreational activities such as hunting, fishing and boating.

Know Your Sport Shoes

If you play a sport three or more times per week, a sport-specific shoe may be necessary. Remember that after 300 to 500 miles of running or 300 hours of aerobic activity, the cushioning material in a shoe is usually worn down and it’s time to toss the shoes.

Running Shoes 

Running shoes come in a range of shapes suited to different running styles/abilities. More advanced runners tend to wear flatter and flexible shoes, which allow them to run more quickly with greater comfort.

An athletic shoe is a name for a shoe designed for sporting and physical activities, and is different in style and build than a dress shoe. Originally used mainly during sports, today they are worn as casual footwear. They are often very comfortable and usually have lots of padding.

Running shoes

Conventional thinking suggests that a good running shoe should have ample cushioning to absorb shock, but there are advocates for minimalist running shoes that have with almost no cushioning. No data exist to say which type of shoe is better, but if you choose a cushioned shoe, look for overall shock absorption for the foot and good heel control. Although not a cure-all, these qualities in a running shoe may help prevent shin splints, tendinitis, heel pain, stress fractures and other overuse syndromes. Joggers should wear a shoe with more cushioning impact. Running shoes are designed to provide maximum overall shock absorption for the foot. Such a shoe should also have good heel control. Although not a cure-all, these qualities in a running/sports shoe help prevent shin splints, tendinitis, heel pain, stress fractures and other overuse syndromes.

They are made of flexible kinds of material featuring soles made from rubber and an upper part made with leather or canvas. Sneakers were originally for sporting use, although today they are used as casual footwear. They are worn in school for their versatility and comfort. They are almost silent; somebody wearing sneakers can sneak up on another person. They are worn for many different types of sports.

We know you don’t need all the latest, expensive technology and equipment to enjoy a run; all you really need is a running shoes and the open road. Though for some, it can be difficult to find a great pair to get the job done without breaking the bank.

Whether you’re just looking to log a few extra miles each week or get back in the game after a slow spring start, here are the best new running shoes we can’t wait to test all summer long.

Walking Shoes 

If walking is your sport or your doctor’s recommendation for cardiovascular conditioning, wear a lightweight shoe. Look for extra shock absorption in the heel of the shoe and especially under the ball of the foot (the metatarsal area). This will help reduce heel pain (plantar fasciitis and pump bumps) as well as burning and tenderness in the ball of the foot (metatarsalgia). A shoe with a slightly rounded sole or rocker bottom also helps to smoothly shift weight from the heel to the toes while decreasing the forces across the foot.

Walking shoes

Walking shoes have more rigidity in the front so you can roll off your toes rather than bend through them as you do with running shoes.

Aerobic Shoes 

Shoes for aerobic conditioning should be lightweight to prevent foot fatigue and have extra shock absorption in the sole beneath the ball of the foot (metatarsal area), where the most stress occurs. If possible, work out on a carpet.

Tennis Shoes 

Tennis players need a shoe that supports the foot during quick side-to-side movements or shifts in weight. A shoe that provides stability on the inside and outside of the foot is an important choice. Flexibility in the sole beneath the ball of the foot allows repeated, quick forward movements for a fast reaction at the net. You need slightly less shock absorption in the shoe if you’re playing tennis or other racquet sports. On soft courts, wear a softer soled shoe that allows better traction. On hard courts, you want a sole with greater tread.

Basketball Shoes

If basketball is your sport, choose a shoe with a thick, stiff sole. This gives extra stability when running on the court. A high-top shoe may provide added support but won’t necessarily decrease the risk of ankle sprain or injury.

Basketball Shoes

Cross Trainers 

Cross-training shoes, or cross trainers, combine several of the above features so that you can participate in more than one sport. A good cross trainer should have the flexibility in the forefoot you need for running combined with the lateral control necessary for aerobics or tennis. You do not necessarily need a different pair of shoes for every sport in which you participate. Generally, you should wear sport-specific shoes for sports you play more than three times a week. If you have worked out for some time injury-free, then stick with the particular shoe you have been wearing. There is really no reason to change. For special problems, you may need a special shoe. A well-cushioned shoe may not be a good shoe for someone who overpronates. If your ankles turn easily, you may need to wear a shoe with a wide heel. If you have trouble with shin splints, you may need a shoe with better shock absorption.

Design Features 

Sport shoes vary in materials and design as well as how they are made. Look inside the shoe before you decide to buy. This will help you select a shoe that fits both your foot and your sport. Special features in construction give comfort to the wearer as well as help prevent injury: A slip-lasted shoe is made by sewing together the upper like a moccasin and then gluing it to the sole. This lasting method makes for a lightweight and flexible shoe with no torsional rigidity. A board-lasted shoe has the “upper” leather or canvas sewn to a cardboard-like material. A person with flat feet (pes planus) feels more support and finds improved control in this type of shoe. A combination-lasted shoe combines advantages of both other shoes. It is slip-lasted in the front and board-lasted in the back. These shoes give good heel control but remain flexible in the front under the ball of the foot. They are good for a wide variety of foot types.

Shoe Fit 

The best designed shoes in the world will not do their job if they do not fit properly. You can avoid foot problems by finding a shoe store that employs a pedorthist or professional shoe fitter who knows about the different shapes and styles of shoes. Or you can become an informed consumer by following these guidelines: Don’t go just by size. Have your feet measured. Visit the shoe store at the end of a workout when your feet are largest. Wear the socks you normally wear when working out. Fit the shoe to the largest foot. Make sure the shoe provides at least one thumb’s breadth of space from the longest toe to the end of the toe box. If you have bunions or hammertoes, find a shoe with a wide toe box. You should be able to fully extend your toes when you’re standing, and shoes should be comfortable from the moment you put them on. They will not stretch out. Women who have big or wide feet should consider buying men’s or boys’ shoes, which are cut wider for the same length.

Womens shoes

Mens shoes

Childrens shoes

Athletic shoes